Crash victims are laid to rest

The remains of double crash victim Declan McKenna are carried from his home in Kilrea on the way to St Mary's Church, on Wednesday afternoon. Declan died alongside his friend Christopher O'Neill in a crash on the outskirts of the Co-Derry town on Saturday morning. Picture Margaret mcLaughlin � by-line 10-7-13
The remains of double crash victim Declan McKenna are carried from his home in Kilrea on the way to St Mary's Church, on Wednesday afternoon. Declan died alongside his friend Christopher O'Neill in a crash on the outskirts of the Co-Derry town on Saturday morning. Picture Margaret mcLaughlin � by-line 10-7-13
0
Have your say

THE two Kilrea men who died on the Agivey Road last weekend have been laid to rest.

Christopher O’Neill was laid to rest at St Mary’s Church Drumagarner last Thursday.

His friend Declan McKenna was buried at the same church last Wednesday.

The men, both aged in their 20s, died after their BMW car crashed and burst into flames on the Agivey Road area of the town.

Christopher was a rising figure in Sinn Fein and chairman of its Kilrea branch.

He stood unsuccessfully for a seat on Coleraine Borough Council in the 2011 local government elections.

His grandfather John Davey, who survived Michael Stone’s attack at Milltown Cemetery in 1988, was a Sinn Fein councillor before he was murdered by loyalists in 1989.

Meanhile, Declan’s uncle, Noel McKenna, was a former SDLP mayor of Derry City.

First Minister Martin McGuinness last week paid tribute to both men.

He said that ‘Republicans in County Derry and beyond were deeply shocked’ by the sad news of the double tragedy.

The pair, who both attended St Paul’s College, had been returning home from a night out when the fatal crash occured.

SDLP Assembly member John Dallat said the community was stunned and shocked by the horrific deaths .

But, he said that the community had rallied to support both families.

Police in Coleraine have appealed for any witnesses to the incident to come forward.

You can call 0845 600 800 or call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111