Getting rid of our A&E would be ‘catastrophic’

DOCTOR ON CALL. Pictured at an Exhibition and Dinner to mark the 75th Anniversary of the Robinson Hospital on Wednesday evening at the Town Hall are Dr Bert Harvey and Dr John Robb.BM26-031SC.
DOCTOR ON CALL. Pictured at an Exhibition and Dinner to mark the 75th Anniversary of the Robinson Hospital on Wednesday evening at the Town Hall are Dr Bert Harvey and Dr John Robb.BM26-031SC.

ONE of the doctors who campaigned for a new hospital in Coleraine from the late 1970’s says that there will be catastrophic consequences if health bosses remove acute services from the Causeway Hospital.

Dr John Robb, who was present at Stormont last week for the debate on the proposal to remove acute services at the hospital, said: “Having worked as a surgeon in the Causeway Hospital’s predecessor, campaigned for the new Causeway Hospital not so long ago, and having been an inpatient, outpatient and visitor in the Causeway Hospital, I wish to express dismay at the current proposal to remove its A&E unit.

“I don’t think it is a good idea to have people who have no medical experience running the health service, making decisions, and trying to recruit staff.

“Nobody who has a nine-to-five philosophy and sits in an office all day knows what the health service needs.

“Getting rid of the A&E at the Causeway Hospital would be catastrophic and would certainly put people’s lives at risk particularly when it comes to emergency situations — such as the one encountered at the NW 200 where they need immediate resuscitation.”

Dr Robb’s comments come just weeks after another senior doctor warned of the dangerous consequences of closing services at the Causeway Hospital.

Dr Owen Finnegan, a consultant physician, said any attempt to cut acute services at the Causeway Hospital will lead to “significant health risk” and “significant deterioration in the delivery and standard of healthcare”.

STORMONT DEBATE SPECIAL P21