G-Mac’s firm cards its best year as profits grow again

Graeme McDowell's Boyport Services Ltd show the firm enjoyed its most successful year to date in 2012 after recording profits of �2.643m (�3.1m). �INPHO/Cathal Noonan
Graeme McDowell's Boyport Services Ltd show the firm enjoyed its most successful year to date in 2012 after recording profits of �2.643m (�3.1m). �INPHO/Cathal Noonan
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Golf ace Graeme McDowell’s career is flourishing under the direction of the Dublin sports agency spurned by his friend Rory McIlroy.

New accounts from G-Mac’s Boyport Services Ltd show the firm enjoyed its most successful year to date in 2012 after recording profits of £2.643m (€3.1m).

Accumulated profits rose from £3.539m to £6.182m in the 12 months to the end of December. Last year’s increase followed profits growing by £2m to £3.5m in 2011. Cash at newly-married McDowell’s firm more than doubled last year from £1.579m to £3.79m.

The golfer’s career is steered by Conor Ridge’s Horizon Sports Management, which is involved in a public spat with McIlroy after he left the firm.

McDowell extended his business interests this year when he opened the Nona Blue Tavern in Orlando, where he has lived for the past eight years. The 34-year-old has yet to return to the heights of his 2010 Pebble Beach US Open triumph, but he was runner-up in a number of tournaments last year.

His success on the course has won him a slew of sponsors including MasterCard, shoe and clothing firm ecco, IT firm Verizon, financial services firm RBC, watchmaker Audemars Piguet and golf ball and equipment maker Srixon.

Meanwhile, the European Tour has rubber-stamped a date change for the Irish Open which makes it easier for McIlroy and fellow Major champion McDowell to tee it up in their home event next June.

A proposal to move the Irish event forward seven days on the schedule – to the week immediately after the US Open at Pinehurst – was passed at a meeting of Europe’s Tournament Players Committee in Vilamoura.

The introduction of a new rule requiring the Tour’s top players to commit each year to playing in the primary event in their home country was also discussed.