WATCH: Video details history of Royal Portrush and proposed changes

Darren Clarke with the Claret jug on the 5th green at the official announcement that The Open Championship is to be held in Royal Portrush in 2019, and twice more before 2040. Picture by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye
Darren Clarke with the Claret jug on the 5th green at the official announcement that The Open Championship is to be held in Royal Portrush in 2019, and twice more before 2040. Picture by Kelvin Boyes / Press Eye
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The Open was first played outside of Scotland or England when the tournament was played at Royal Portrush in 1951.

Max Faulkner claimed his only major title with a two-shot victory, while home favourite Fred Daly finished in a tie for fourth.

Faulkner found the Dunluce Course to his liking having been twice a runner-up in the Irish Open at the same venue.

He opened with rounds of 71 and 70 to claim the halfway lead, and another solid 70 in the third round extended his advantage to six shots over the field.

Faulkner maintained a healthy lead for much of the last round, but he wobbled on the 16th when his drive finished inches from the out-of-bounds markers.

But rather than chipping back out to the fairway, Faulkner smashed a three-wood which started out-of-bounds before fading back into play, pitching on the fairway and bounding onto the green. His playing partner Frank Stranahan described it as “the greatest shot I’ve ever seen”.

Faulkner closed out a final-round 74 to finish on three under, but Argentine Antonio Cerda still had a chance to catch the Englishman midway through his last 18 holes.

But Cerda came in with a 70 to finish two shots adrift, leaving Faulkner to pick up the Claret Jug and the winner’s cheque for £300.

This video shows Faulkner’s triumph, the evolution of the course and the work currently taking place to prepare for the 2019 tournament.

Earlier this year the proposals were approved by the Royal Portrush membership and the work is being overseen by Martin Ebert of Mackenzie & Ebert the Club’s golf course architects. As well as creating two new holes, a series of other changes are being made to the course to enhance the challenge that will face the world’s top golfers while remaining true to the ethos of Harry Colt’s original design.

The most significant changes will be to move the 2nd green to lengthen the par five hole by around 40 yards and on the current 10th hole, which will be the 12th at The Open, to alter the line of the hole and extend it by 50 yards. Elsewhere, the existing 8th green (the 10th at The Open), which was not designed by Colt, will be reshaped and several new back tees will be created.

The overall length of the course will increase by just under 200 yards to 7,337 yards and the number of bunkers will be increased by three to 62 in total, still leaving Royal Portrush with the fewest bunkers of any of the courses which host The Open.

The work on the Dunluce Links is due to be complete by the middle of 2016 with the two new holes being given time to grow-in ahead of the following season.